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Attention all honorees (Grand Marshals Irishmen of the Year, etc...) an important message for your special day.

 

                   

 

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2010 Washington, D.C. Saint Patrick's Day Parade

Sunday, March 15, 2010 Noon to 3 PM

"The Nation's" parade

 

The 2010 St. Patrick’s Day Parade Committee of Washington, D.C. is proud to announce that Norah O'Donnell, chief Washington, D.C. correspondent for MSNBC, will preside as the Grand Marshal of the 38th annual Washington, D.C. St. Patrick’s Day Parade on March 15, 2010.

Historic Constitution Avenue - 7th to 17th Streets NW

        Sunday, March 11, 2007 Noon

Constitution Avenue

History of the Washington, DC St. Patrick's Day Parade
The first St. Patrick's Day Parade in Washington, D.C. was held in 1971 and traveled along Massachusetts Avenue from Dupont Circle to the statue of Robert Emmet. Since then, this annual affair has grown from what was little more than a leisurely stroll by a few hundred participants to what is now being called "The Nation's St. Patrick's Day Parade."

In 1974, the Constitution Avenue route was established and the march became a full-scale Parade with Marching Bands, Pipe Bands, our Nation's Military, Police, and Fire Departments as well as Floats, Novelty Groups and those marchers wearing green. Trophies are now awarded in a number of categories to participants. The Parade next year will be on Sunday, March 15th, 2010.

Traditionally, the parade is not a forum for political issues. Elected officials march, but those running for office are not allowed to use the Parade as a campaign site.

The Parade is an Irish community endeavor that was started by the Irish American Club and is now held in cooperation with the National Capital Park Service. The President of the Irish American Club maintains a place on the Board of Directors of the Parade Committee.

The Parade has grown both in size and prestige. Through the work of the Parade Committee, a group of 40 or more dedicated Washingtonians, the two-and-a-half hour spectacular event is created. Their work begins in September before the March Parade. In September invitations go out to bands and marching groups and to sponsors and floats and other groups. In January, the Committee's work begins in earnest. the Parade's Magazine, considered to be one of the most professional parade magazines in the nation, is formulated and articles are solicited from prominent writers reflecting the chosen theme for that year.

The Committee holds six to eight fundraisers before the parade. Every one of the local pubs sponsors a parade party. These events are almost as much fun as the parade itself and are open to the public. Irish musicians, dancers and singers get everyone in the mood for Parade Day.

Choosing the Grand Marshal is an important part of the advance planning for the Parade. The men and women chosen to lead this event must be considered carefully. In 1986, retiring Speaker of the House Thomas P. "Tip" O'Neill honored Washington by being Grand Marshal in what he called, "the last greatest honor of my Washington career." Included in our distinguished list of Grand Marshals are Helen Hayes - the First Lady of the American Theater, and John Hume - leader of the Social Democratic and Labor Party.

Also a tradition starting with the very first parades is the Gael of the Year, an honor given to an outstanding person in the Washington DC area who has made a significant contribution to the community. Some of the past Gaels include Paul Berry - TV News co-anchor and Humanitarian, Father Eugene Riordan - Educator and Missionary, and our recently deceased Committee Member, Parade Photographer, and friend of the Irish Community, Pat "Irish Eyes" Cady.

Everyone is Irish on St. Patrick's Day, and truly this Parade is for everyone. It is a family day. A day when people come together to enjoy the sharing of culture, the celebration of being Irish or almost Irish and to enjoy a well-planned, well-run event that is worth the trip to Constitution Avenue to set the tone of spring.

History of the Washington, D.C. St. Patrick's Day Parade

The first St. Patrick's Day Parade in Washington, D.C. was held in 1871 and traveled along Massachusetts Avenue from Dupont Cirlce to the statue of Robert Emmet. Since then, this annual affair has grown from what was little more than a leisurely stroll by a few hundred participants to what is now being called "The Nation's St. Patrick's Day Parade."

In 1874, the Constitution Avenue route was established and the march became a full-scale Parade with Marching Bands, Pipe Bands, our Nation's Military, Police, and Fire Departments as well as Floats, Novelty Groups and those marchers wearing green. Trophies are now awarded in a number of categories to participants. The Parade next year will be on Sunday, March 12th, 2006.

Traditionally, the parade is not a forum for political issues. Elected officials march, but those running for office are not allowed to use the Parade as a campaign site.

The Parade is an Irish community endeavor that was started by the Irish American Club and is now held in cooperation with the National Capital Park Service. The President of the Irish American Club maintains a place on the Board of Directors of the Parade Committee.

The Parade has grown both in size and prestige. Through the work of the Parade Committee, a group of 40 or more dedicated Washingtonians, the two-and-a-half hour spectacular event is created. Their work begins in September before the March Parade. In September invitations go out to bands and marching groups and to sponsors and floats and other groups. In January, the Committee's work begins in earnest. the Parade's Magazine, considered to be one of the most professional parade magazines in the nation, is formulated and articles are solicited from prominent writers reflecting the chosen theme for that year.

The Committee holds six to eight fundraisers before the parade. Every one of the local pubs sponsors a parade party. These events are almost as much fun as the parade itself and are open to the public. Irish musicians, dancers and signers get everyone in the mood for Parade Day.

Choosing the Grand Marshal is an important part of the advance planning for the Parade. The men and women chosen to lead this event must be considered carefully. In 1886, retiring Speaker of the House Thomas P. "Tip" O'Neill honored Washington by being Grand Marshal in what he called, "the last greatest honor of my Washington career." Included in our distinguished list of Grand Marshals are Helen Hayes - the First Lady of the American Theater, and John Hume - leader of the Social Democratic and Labor Party.

Also a tradition starting with the very first parades is the Gael of the Year, an honor given to an outstanding person in the Washington DC area who has made a significant contribution to the community. Some of the past Gaels include Paul Berry - TV News co-anchor and Humanitarian, Father Eugene Riordan - Educator and Missionary, and our recently deceased Committee Member, Parade Photographer, and friend of the Irish Community, Pat "Irish Eyes" Cady.

Everyone is Irish on St. Patrick's Day, and truly this Parade is for everyone. It is a family day. A day when people come together to enjoy the sharing of culture, the celebration of being Irish or almost Irish and to enjoy a well-planned, well-run event that is worth the trip to Constitution Avenue to set the tone of Spring.

History of the Washington, D.C. St. Patrick's Day Parade

The first St. Patrick's Day Parade in Washington, D.C. was held in 1871 and traveled along Massachusetts Avenue from Dupont Cirlce to the statue of Robert Emmet. Since then, this annual affair has grown from what was little more than a leisurely stroll by a few hundred participants to what is now being called "The Nation's St. Patrick's Day Parade."

In 1874, the Constitution Avenue route was established and the march became a full-scale Parade with Marching Bands, Pipe Bands, our Nation's Military, Police, and Fire Departments as well as Floats, Novelty Groups and those marchers wearing green. Trophies are now awarded in a number of categories to participants.

Traditionally, the parade is not a forum for political issues. Elected officials march, but those running for office are not allowed to use the Parade as a campaign site.

The Parade is an Irish community endeavor that was started by the Irish American Club and is now held in cooperation with the National Capital Park Service. The President of the Irish American Club maintains a place on the Board of Directors of the Parade Committee.

The Parade has grown both in size and prestige. Through the work of the Parade Committee, a group of 40 or more dedicated Washingtonians, the two-and-a-half hour spectacular event is created. Their work begins in September before the March Parade. In September invitations go out to bands and marching groups and to sponsors and floats and other groups. In January, the Committee's work begins in earnest. the Parade's Magazine, considered to be one of the most professional parade magazines in the nation, is formulated and articles are solicited from prominent writers reflecting the chosen theme for that year.

The Committee holds six to eight fundraisers before the parade. Every one of the local pubs sponsors a parade party. These events are almost as much fun as the parade itself and are open to the public. Irish musicians, dancers and signers get everyone in the mood for Parade Day.

Choosing the Grand Marshal is an important part of the advance planning for the Parade. The men and women chosen to lead this event must be considered carefully. In 1886, retiring Speaker of the House Thomas P. "Tip" O'Neill honored Washington by being Grand Marshal in what he called, "the last greatest honor of my Washington career." Included in our distinguished list of Grand Marshals are Helen Hayes - the First Lady of the American Theater, and John Hume - leader of the Social Democratic and Labor Party.

Also a tradition starting with the very first parades is the Gael of the Year, an honor given to an outstanding person in the Washington DC area who has made a significant contribution to the community. Some of the past Gaels include Paul Berry - TV News co-anchor and Humanitarian, Father Eugene Riordan - Educator and Missionary, and our recently deceased Committee Member, Parade Photographer, and friend of the Irish Community, Pat "Irish Eyes" Cady.

Everyone is Irish on St. Patrick's Day, and truly this Parade is for everyone. It is a family day. A day when people come together to enjoy the sharing of culture, the celebration of being Irish or almost Irish and to enjoy a well-planned, well-run event that is worth the trip to Constitution Avenue to set the tone of Spring.

For additional info visit our friends @ www.dcstpatsparade.com

• PARADE ROUTE INFO:
From 11:30 am until the end of the parade, at approximately 2:15 pm, Constitution Avenue and all cross-streets from 7th to 17th streets will be closed to traffic, as well as Madison and Jefferson from 7th to 14th streets. Click here to view Parade Route Info.

The Parade magazine, featuring the line of march as well as articles of interest to the Irish community and those who enjoy being Irish on Parade Day, will be available along the parade route.

If you are a vendor interested in selling along the parade route, please call the District of Columbia government office responsible for licensing vendors.

If you would like to help out in organizing next year’s parade or becoming a Committee member, please go to the Member section of this Website for more information.

If you need additional information, please call the Washington, D.C. St. Patrick's Day Parade phone line at (202) 637-2474. Leave your name, telephone number and the nature of your call at the tone. Your message is limited to one minute.

Grand Stand Tickets*
Grand stand tickets are available for sale at $5.00. The grand stand is located next to the Reviewing Stand on the south side of Constitution Avenue at the Washington Monument Parking entrance (16th Street NW).
Use our automated form to fill out your ticket request, print it out and mail it to us. Or you can order your tickets online.
*Tickets will be mailed for orders up to March 5, 2006. After that date ticket requests should call 301-384-6533 or by e-mail johndbowen@earthlink.net

• Getting to the Parade
Parking, as for any event downtown is difficult and we recommend Metrorail (click to view/print map)
. The Smithsonian or Federal Triangle exits on the orange/blue lines are recommended. We also recommend exiting at the Archives/Navy Memorial Metro stop on the Yellow/Green lines, the Smithsonian stop on the Blue/Orange lines, or the L'Enfant Plaza stop on the Blue/Orange/Yellow/Green lines.

• Registering Your Unit
Register your unit
for the 2006 Washington, D.C. St. Patrick's Day Parade.

For additional info visit our friends @ www.dcstpatsparade.com